How many indemnities have been paid in connection with A465 Heads of the Valleys claims


THE Welsh government has paid £ 45.6million in compensation to people whose land has been affected by road works on the A465 Heads of the Valleys road.

Major work to improve the A465, which connects Herefordshire to Neath, has been underway for almost 20 years, and during this time the government has paid dozens of claims to people for the loss of land , or because its value has depreciated.

Some of the claims are for huge sums of money: one claimant along sections 5 and 6 of the road (Dowlais Top in Hirwaun) has been awarded £ 10.7million.

At the other end of the scale, a claimant along stretch 4 (Tredegar to Dowlais Top) managed to earn £ 2.38 in compensation.

The figures were released by the Welsh government in response to a Freedom of Information request, which asked how much money had been paid through the Land Compensation Act 1973 in connection with work on the A465.

The Land Compensation Act allows people to make a claim if certain public works – such as altering existing roads or airport runways – affect the land they own.

They can claim if they believe the work has depreciated the value of their land property, and the law can also be used to compensate people who lose their homes as a result of construction work.

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In the case of the A465, at least 91 complaints have been accepted since the first ones were filed in 2000.

Upgrades to Section 1 of the road, which connects Abergavenny to Gilwern, lasted from 2005 to 2008, but figures show compensation was still being paid last year (£ 4,186 in 2020).

In total, the sums paid to successful claimants along Section 1 totaled £ 7.4million between 2004 and 2020. The largest payment was £ 1.4million and the smallest of just 4 pounds sterling. The total number of successful complaints for this section of the A465 is unknown.

Along Section 2, between Gilwern and Brynmawr, leveling work began in late 2014 and is still ongoing, having been affected by construction difficulties in the Clydach Gorge area. Figures show that 40 applicants have so far been successful on this stretch of road.

Money paid along Section 2 totals over £ 4.5million, with the largest payment being £ 1.9million – in 2015 – and the smallest being £ 770.

Along Section 3, from Brynmawr to Tredegar, upgrade work took place between 2013 and 2015, but payments were made through the Land Compensation Act 1973 for almost 20 years, including every year since 2011.

Over £ 4.4million has been awarded in total to 38 applicants. The largest successful claim was £ 691,000 and the smallest £ 1,485.

Work is also completed on the section of Section 4 of the road, which was carried out between 2002 and 2004. Compensation totaling over £ 14.8million has been awarded to an unknown number of claimants along this route. stretch, between 2002 and 2020. The largest price was £ 1.7million and the smallest was the aforementioned £ 2.38.

Finally, Sections 5 and 6 are expected to be the last stages to be completed, over the next few years, and although modernization work there is still relatively recent, compensation in excess of £ 14.3million has been paid so far. ‘now to some 13 applicants. The size of these accepted claims ranged from £ 10.7million to £ 3,220.

Commenting on the numbers, a Welsh government spokesperson said in our sister title, South WalesArgus: “Compensation for individuals and businesses affected by road improvements is paid in accordance with legal procedures and is generally based on the advice of professionals representing the parties concerned.

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